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Alcoholics Anonymous For Alcohol Addicts

The Founding Of Alcoholics Anonymous


Recovering alcoholics have benefitted from the support provided by Alcoholics Anonymous for many years. The group was founded by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith who are both recovering alcoholics in 1935, it began as a community-based fellowship in order to encourage sobriety in many recovering alcoholics. The two came up with what is known as the 12 Steps to guide the meetings which later gave birth to the "12 traditions" that set out the reason for the AA's existence. Many people that have recovered from alcoholism always have something positive to say about the group and the help they were accorded.


Today, Alcoholics Anonymous has more than 2,000,000 active members all over the world and more than 50 thousand of support groups countrywide.


What The Aa Meeting Entails

If you've never been to one before, it may be daunting to attend an AA meeting. It requires the individual to venture out of his or her comfort zone and admit before a room full of strangers that they have a problem and need some assistance to get better. Fortunately, every participant within AA is fully aware about how the other feels. It must be understood that the organisation was founded by recovering alcoholics, and the model has served the community well even to this day. For recovering alcoholics, AA provides a special environment where they can open up and not feel judged because every person involved was an alcoholic at some point.


New members are made to feel comfortable The best way to recover is through opening up about your journey but it is not mandatory to speak in the meetings. This is because it takes time for one to build trust so they can open up to strangers. After some time, they start feeling at home and find tremendous relief and healing through openly sharing their experiences.


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Closed And Open Meetings

A closed AA meeting is attended only by recovering alcoholic addicts or those seeking to know how to go about kicking the habit.

The family and people close to the recovering alcoholic are allowed to attend the open meetings. Depending on your comfort level, you can choose to either attend the open or closed meetings. A certain share of the people attending these meetings prefer to keep their therapy separated from the rest of their lives. There those who need family and friends to be there when they attend the meetings.


The Twelve Steps For Aa

These 12 Steps have been the backbone of the AA meetings. The steps are meant to be followed as a cycle although they are listed linearly. Some of the steps mentioned could be revisited until the recovering alcoholic is comfortable during that stage of their recovery process.

One starts with acknowledging they are having a problem and they cannot solve it on their own. Subsequently, the steps include making decisions to quit, accepting yourselves and others the wrongs which may have been committed, making amends for the wrongdoings along with making a commitment to improve continually. Here is ore information about the 12 stages of recovery.


Objections To Aa

Most people are not comfortable with attending a meeting with AA and therefore, come up with reasons not to attend. Some of their common objections are the following:

  • They are not convinced the meetings can help them
  • They are afraid to see someone they know at the meeting
  • They haven't seen their alcoholism as a problem yet

It is important at this stage to focus on the fact that you have genuine reasons for having considered going to the meetings in the first place even if the other reasons are weighing heavily on you.

If you think you need help, most likely you do. There will be no harm for you if you go to a meeting; besides, it can potentially save you from years of suffering caused by your addiction.


Identifying An Alcoholics Anonymous Group

The AA groups are widespread everywhere and you will definitely find one near you. There is usually a schedule of meetings for each group; it is best to join as soon as you can. Choose the kind of a meeting you want to attend - a closed or open one - and in what area, and you will be able to find a group online using our meeting finder. Call us no 0800 246 1509 we are happy to help you locate an AA group today.