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Talk to Frank

About Talk To Frank

Converse with Frank is the extensive running anti-drug movement the UK has had. But has it actually worked and stopped drug use?

A decade ago a police SWAT team slammed into a peaceful kitchen somewhere in the suburbs and modified the image of drugs education in the United Kingdom for always. Grim warnings about how drugs could mess you up and genuine pleas to resist the pushers that were creeping around every playground were gone. A lighter, more humorous approach was used instead.


In the first ad, a mother suggests to her teenage son that they have a chat about drugs so he calls the police snatch squad. The message was new as well: "Drugs are illicit. Discussing them isn't. So Talk to Frank."


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Frank, the new identity for the National Drugs Helpline, was coined by the advertising agency Mother. Young people were meant to feel Frank was a helpful elder brother they could trust and from whom they could seek advice on illegal drugs. Entirety from the ventures of Pablo, the canine medications mule, to a visit cycle a mind, distribution centre has been exhibited under the Frank name, making it a natural brand name among the country's youth.


According to the creative director, Justin Tindall, of the advertising agency, Leo Burnett, it was important that Frank was at no time seen in the flesh so that he could never be the victim of ridicule for wearing the incorrect shoes or attempting to be "down with the kids". Even the YouTube videos that spoof Frank are respectful. There's also no indication that Frank is working for the government, which is unusual for a government funded campaign.

Right from the days of Nancy Reagan, a lot has been done about drugs education, and the Grange Hill cast which a lot of people opine that it did more harm than good, simply encouraged people to "Just Say No" to drugs.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. In some places where there are still tough penalties for possession, ads showing prison bars or disappointed parents are still the norm. A recent campaign launched in Singapore informed young people who visit clubs, "You play, you pay".

In the United States of America, the federal government has spent millions of dollars on a long-running campaign, Above the Influence, that sells positive possibilities to using substances by making use of a combination of funny and cautionary stories. The stress is on chatting to youngsters by using their language - one advertisement depicts a group of "stoners" forsaken on a couch. However, an amazing number of anti-drug battles far and wide still fall back on terrify strategies and specifically, the drug driven "fall into hell." One example is one of the DrugsNot4Me series in Canada that revealed how a very pretty confident woman slipped into deep-eyed wreck because of drugs.

Ads that reveal the dangers of drug abuse mostly push frustrated people into experimenting with drugs, according to a data from the anti-drugs campaign of the UK from 1999 to 2004.


The opposition Conservative politicians were initially against Frank, simply because it pointed out the ups and downs of drug use, but it made giant strides.


An early ad posted online told viewers, "Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world."

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. Matt Powell was the creative director of digital agency Profero, the company that came up with the cocaine ad; he now thinks he miscalculated the time an average user spends on browsing the internet. A few people might have stayed around for the animation's end to discover more regarding the undesirable effects. However, Powell says the point was to be more legitimate with youngsters about medications, keeping in mind the end goal to build up the believability of the Frank brand.

The Home Office says 67% of youngsters in a study said they would swing to Frank in the event that they required drug guidance. In 2011 and 2012, Frank received 225,892 calls and 3,341,777 visits to the website. It is evidence that the method is effective.

But, we don't have any proofs that people have quit drug consumption because of Frank, just as we don't have such evidence in cases of other media campaigns against drugs.

Drug usage in the UK has gone around 9% in the decade since the conflict propelled, yet specialists say quite a bit of this is down to a decrease in cannabis utilization, potentially connected to changing states of mind towards smoking tobacco among youngsters.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national service that offers drug education and was formed in 2003 by the Department of Health in partnership with Home Office of the British government. It was designed to lower the rate of both legal and illegal drug use by providing education to teenagers and young people about what the effects of using drug and alcohol could be. A lot of media campaigns have been put out on both the radio and the internet.


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Services

Available services at FRANK for those who seek help about drugs include:

  • A website
  • A 24 hour telephone line that is strictly confidential
  • Email
  • A confidential live chat service, available from 2pm-6pm daily
  • A service to find treatment and counselling