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Getting Assistance - Treatment

What's substance Dependency?

Substance dependency is a chronic illness that is identified by uncontrollable substance seeking and use, regardless of the harmful effects and alterations in the brain that can be permanent. The harmful habits of people suffering from drug addiction come as a result of these changes inside the brain. Drug dependency is a degenerative illness. Relapse is a situation where the person goes back to drug use after making efforts to overcome addiction.


Using drugs out of one's volition is the road that leads to drug addiction. However, the mental strength to decide whether to use drugs or not is eroded with time. The desire to search for and make use of drugs will now rely on a very huge urge. This unrelenting craving results from the effects of the drug on the brain over time. Dependency affects regions of the brain that are involved in learning and memory; motivation and reward; and command over behaviour.

Addiction is a sickness that influences both the mind and conduct.


Is Drug Addiction Treatable?

Yes, yet it's not simple. Since dependency is a chronic illness, individuals cannot just quit using the substances for a day or two and be cured of it. Most users require repeated or long-term care to quit using it altogether and get their lives back.


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An addict in treatment must work toward the following:

  • desist from drug use
  • remain drug-free
  • be profitable in the family, at work and in the public arena

Values Of Successful Rehabilitation

Ongoing scientific research since the 1970s has shown that the following basic principles should be the basis of any effective course of treatment:

  • Though addiction is very complicated, it could heal completely, and it affects the workings of the human brain and human behaviour.
  • There is no one treatment that will work for everyone.
  • Treatment needs to be readily available.
  • To be successful, the treatment plan should not focus on the addiction only but the whole person.
  • It is extremely important to remain under treatment for a very long period of time.
  • The most common forms of treatment are behaviour therapies like counselling.
  • Together with psychological treatment, pharmaceutical drugs are also administered.
  • To make sure the user's most current requirements are met, there is a need for continuous evaluations and adjustments to the treatment regime.
  • Treatment ought to address other conceivable mental problems.
  • The cleansing administered by medical personnel is the beginning step of the journey.
  • For treatment to be successful, it does not need to be voluntary.
  • Substance use during treatment should be observed constantly.
  • A treatment programme must test a patient for hepatitis B and C, TB, HIV/AIDS and other infectious illnesses and educate the patient about things he/she can do to reduce his/her risk of these diseases.

How Is Drug Addiction Treated?

Effective treatment comprises many steps:

  • detoxification (the procedure by which the body frees itself of a medication)
  • behavioural counselling
  • medication (for tobacco, alcohol or opioid dependency)
  • Making sure that coexisting mental health issues like depression or anxiety are evaluated and treated
  • Relapse prevention through long-term check-ups

A scope of care with a custom-made treatment program and follow-up choices can be pivotal for achievement.


Treatment should compromise mental and medical health services as required. Often, community or family based recovery groups or support systems are used as part of follow up care.


How Are Meds Utilised As A Part Of Drug Compulsion Treatment?

The treatment of co-occurring health issues, avoidance of relapse and amelioration of the withdrawal symptoms are some of the cases where medications are needed.

  • Withdrawal The withdrawal symptoms that are witnessed when detox is done could be alleviated with medications. Detoxification is just the very first step in the process and not "treatment" in itself. Patient who doesn't get any further treatment after detoxification as a rule resumes their drug usage. According to one study of treatment centres, medications were utilised in close to 80 per cent of detoxifications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Preventing Relapse Medications can help manage cravings and help patients re-establish normal brain activity. Various medicines are used for narcotics (pain killers), tobacco (nicotine) and alcohol dependency. Researchers are creating different solutions to manage stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) and cannabis (marijuana) dependence Individuals who utilize more than one drug, which is extremely normal, require treatment for the majority of the substances they utilise.

How Drug Addiction Is Treated Using Behavioural Therapies

Behavioural treatments aid patients:

  • Change their conducts and practices linked with drug usage
  • Upturn healthy life abilities
  • Keep going with other forms of treatment, like medication and support groups

The settings upon which patents can access their treatments and the approaches used varies.

Outpatient behavioural treatment involves different programs designed for patients with an organised calendar of regular meetings with a counsellor for behavioural health. Individual and group therapy, or a combination of both are involved in most treatment programs.


These programmes usually provide types of behavioural therapy like:

  • cognitive-behavioural therapy, that assists a patient to identify, steer clear of, and deal with the circumstances in which he/she is most probable to resort to substances
  • multidimensional family therapy - designed for teenagers suffering drug addiction and their relatives - which considers several factors that contribute to their drug addiction, with the intention of affecting the functioning of the family in a positive manner
  • motivational interviewing, that makes the most of a person's willingness to alter their behaviour and start treatment
  • motivational incentives (contingency management), where abstinence from drugs is rewarded and motivated with positive reinforcements

Initially, a patient will receive many hours of treatment and will have to frequently attend clinical sessions if they opted for the outpatient therapies. After the completion of the in-depth treatment, a patient moves to frequent outpatient treatment, which does not meet as regularly and for fewer hours every week to assist with maintaining his/her recovery.


Patients dealing with complications caused by long time abuse of drugs may benefit greatly from inpatient also known as residential rehabilitation services. Authorised residential treatment centre offers 24-hour organized and proper care, including safe lodging and medicinal consideration. An inpatient treatment facility can make use of different therapeutic approaches and they are usually aimed at assisting patients to lead a substance-free, crime-free life after completing the treatment.


Cases of residential treatment settings include:

  • A therapeutic community that is a very structured programme in which a patient stays at a residence, usually for 6 months to a year. Everybody at the facility, whether caregivers or administrators and fellow patients play a role in the recovery of the patient helping them cope with the changes and challenges of withdrawal.
  • Shorter-term residential treatment, which ordinarily concentrates on detoxification and also giving early extensive counselling and readiness for treatment in a community based setting.
  • Recovery housing that offers supervised, short-term accommodation for a patient, frequently after other kinds of inpatient/residential treatment. Recovery housing can assist a person to complete the changeover to an independent life-for example, assisting him/her learn how to tackle finances or look for a job, as well as linking them to the community's support services.

Problems Of Re-Admission

The excessive urge to take drugs could be "triggered" by several factors within the brain, as the workings of the brain is altered by drug abuse. It is key for patients in treatment, particularly those treated at prison or inpatient facilities, to learn how to identify, steer clear of, and deal with triggers that they are most likely to experience after treatment.